The Season’s First Harvest

The lettuce needed to be thinned, and some of it was mature enough to be put in a salad, so we enjoyed with our evening meal the first produce from the garden at our new home. This event brought to mind a recent article circulated on Twitter by @Food_Tank (http://www.greenbiz.com/article/urban-farms-now-produce-15-worlds-food). As the headline indicates, as much as one-fifth of the world’s food is now produced by urban farms. One needs to look to places such as sub-Saharan Africa to find cities with truly substantial urban food production. In such places up to 40 percent of the urban population is engaged in food production. That percentage is much smaller in the United States but it appears to be growing.

lettuce
The first lettuce of the season.

Among the issues that the article discusses, this one caught my attention: “How far — and in what direction — can this trend go? What portion of a city’s food can local farmers grow, at what price, and who will be privileged to eat it? And can such projects make a meaningful contribution to food security in an increasingly crowded world?”

Coincidentally—although I don’t believe in coincidences—our church’s adult Sunday School class has been discussing food insecurity after viewing the documentary film A Place at the Table. (https://www.facebook.com/aPlaceAtTheTableMovie). Here’s where the question “who will be privileged to eat it?” becomes salient. The readers of this blog know that I believe small farms and gardens can be a part of the sustainable world that we need to imagine and build for our children and grandchildren. How does the produce from these plots get to the people who need it most, the people who live in the places that have become known as food deserts?

Organizations such as City Green, an urban farm organization run as a nonprofit enterprise, have a mission to provide affordable organic produce to urban areas in and around lower Passaic County, New Jersey. In northeastern Essex County another nonprofit, A Lot to Grow, maintains several community gardens. The vegetables that they raise go to homeless shelters, food pantries, and facilities that provide assistance specifically to seniors.

There are several well-stocked for-profit produce stands and farmers markets selling local produce in season in the area, and we patronize them when we can. There are, however, many times when we have to check our enthusiasm and limit our purchases because locally grown fresh produce can be expensive. We’re not wealthy; we’re still members of a shrinking middle class. If we can’t always afford local produce in season, how can the people who have to string together a series of low-wage jobs possibly afford fresh produce for their families?

We (now a broader “we” than just my spouse and I) might be tempted to think that the U.S. federal government can and should solve the issue of food insecurity and eliminate the food deserts in America’s urban areas. But the federal government won’t. Not even if Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren is elected President in 2016. That’s not intended to be a rant but an observation. There are undoubtedly many elected and appointed officials who would use the power of their office to bring about the necessary changes if they could. However, If Barack and Michelle Obama, who planted a vegetable garden on the White House grounds, could not advance the cause of food security for urban residents, it’s unlikely that any elected official can do so in the near future. The best hope for mitigating food insecurity is still the private sector and nonprofit organizations.

Dear reader, thank you for your patience with this post. My hope and prayer is that just one of you will find a local community garden or urban farming organization to which you can donate some of your time or treasure. Tending a garden, whether it’s my garden or an organization’s garden, is one of the most satisfying forms of work I can think of. The work is physically demanding, to be sure, but the aches and blisters are temporary. Bending over and pulling weeds from the rows of vegetables, or cutting those weeds down with a scuffle hoe, I smile when I think of the people who might enjoy those vegetables in a few weeks. In our country, with the abundance of resources that we can all enjoy sustainably, there is little reason why every resident should not have access to affordable fresh vegetables and fruits in season from local sources.

Thanks, as always, for stopping by.

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