Parsing Paris (COP21)

Hopes and expectations have been high for substantial action to come out of Paris climate talks (officially the  21st Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change or COP21).

The_Earth_seen_from_Apollo_17_with_white_background
The Earth as seen from Apollo 17 on 7th December 1972. NASA photo.

With six days of the conference completed, and six more days to go, it is too early for anyone to pass judgment on the proceedings. I’m not qualified to do that in any event.

We might reasonably expect one outcome, however. That is that the actual good accomplished by the decisions and actions taken at this conference will not live up to the hopes and expectations of the participants and observers. There are too many hurdles for the participating governments to overcome to implement the practices that are needed to reduce the amount of carbon that people put into the atmosphere.

That’s not to say that governments should make the changes that they can make or that we should not support our government in its efforts to reduce U.S. carbon emissions. It is, however, the nature of international relations that each government must look out for the interest of its citizens and must respond to business and other entities that seek to direct the course that government takes. The political priorities of all of the nations of the world will not be set aside to create the unified approach to climate change that the planet needs.

It would be pleasant to think that the Breakthrough Energy Coalition will be successful in developing and deploying technologies that can reduce greenhouse gasses, and I certainly wish these people well, but these are business people who have amassed through aggressive business practices the enormous fortunes that they are now pledging to the cause. Also, as with international relations and politics, is it reasonable to expect profit-oriented businesses to favor reducing greenhouse gas emissions over all other considerations? Will we as shareholders—my retirement funds are largely in equities—tolerate that?

All of this may of course be lazy, ignorant bloviating. What I should be saying is that creation care, including reducing global carbon output, still comes down to the informed and voluntary efforts of individual citizens. It requires that we approach all aspects of our life holistically, with a sense of stewardship instead of entitlement, which living in the United States tends to produce. The already existing outcomes of climate change, including rising sea levels, more frequent and more severe droughts, and more frequent severe storms, also require that we look with compassion toward those who are most directly affected by those outcomes.

The season of Advent reminds us that a day is coming when the creation will be restored and the sins that are pollution and environmental degradation will be removed forever (Isaiah 11:1-9, Romans 8:18-26). Until then, we can always find ways, some small and insignificant, some more substantial, to reduce our carbon footprint and other impacts on creation. One that has caught my attention again recently is reducing the consumption of red meat, particularly mass-produced beef. You may choose other efforts that are more closely aligned with your creation-care priorities. May God bless and encourage you as you pursue them.

If you’ve read this far, thank you for your patience, and thank you for stopping by. Best wishes for a peaceful Advent and Christmas season and for a healthy and contented New Year.

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