Fireflies on the Basil

On a recent morning I was picking some fresh basil to make pesto sauce. I found two fireflies hanging out on the basil plants. By the time I got my camera to try to get a photo they were gone, so I’m substituting a Wikimedia photo of fireflies.

Fireflies, Georgia, US, April 20, 2017
Fireflies, Georgia. By Jud McCranie (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
I checked each basil leaf as I washed them and I’m confident that the fireflies didn’t get into  the pesto (unlike the bug that survived three washings of the lettuce and found its way into a salad).

Two years ago, during our first year in our current home, we hardly saw any fireflies in our yard. Even now the air is not filled with them in the evening, but there are many more than that first summer. I should have suspected that we might not get many fireflies when I was contacted by a lawn care company that first spring. They wanted to have a technician come and spray the yard with pesticide. The previous homeowner had a contract with this company, and I think they also sprayed the lawn with fertilizer and weed killer. I declined the offer.

The decision to spray for pests is a difficult one, especially for families with small children. We want our families to be able to enjoy the great outdoors, but the great outdoors is filled with health hazards. Deer wander through suburban neighborhoods less than two miles from our home. They spread ticks that carry Lyme Disease. Recently lone star ticks have made their way to the northeast. In the southeast they carry Rocky Mountain spotted fever, but in some colder locales they are believed responsible for a potentially life-threatening allergy to meat. Mosquitoes can carry West Nile virus and the Zika virus. Pesticides and repellents can help us keep these risks at bay. Even something as simple as wanting to keep ants from invading our homes sends us to the store for some Raid®.

As we’ve observed in our yard, the use of pesticides can have unintended consequences. Protecting fireflies is not sufficient reason not to treat a yard to keep out or destroy harmful creatures. But maybe protecting other species that play a more active role in our well being, such as pollinators, is. Beyond consideration for individual species such as honeybees, protecting biodiversity is essential, including biodiversity in the soil, which can be greatly affected by the indiscriminate use of pesticides.

Whatever your summer plans are, dear reader, I hope they include plenty of time out where the bugs live: in your yard or garden, at the neighborhood park, or on a hiking trail or bike path. Do your homework and take precautions to guard your health and safety, as we will. Then when evening falls, look for the fireflies. Let them light your way toward a thoughtful, environmentally responsible plan for pest control.

Now, in honor of poet and friend Sandra Duguid Gerstman, a firefly haiku:

Firefly on leaf,
Do you light up in the day,
When I cannot see?

Thanks as always for stopping by!

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3 thoughts on “Fireflies on the Basil

  1. Mary 25 June, 2017 / 10:37 pm

    Nice! I really do love fireflies.

  2. Sandra Duguid Gerstman 26 June, 2017 / 9:01 am

    Dear Pat,
    What a surprising and happy morning– to find a haiku about fireflies written in my honor! Especially when I agonized for a whole Sabbath over which bright clothes to wear to a wedding! Thank you !

    • jerseybackyard 26 June, 2017 / 12:21 pm

      You’re welcome, Sandra. Men do have a much easier time with the “what do I wear to a wedding” question. In a Dilbert cartoon from many years ago he infuriated his female coworker by answering that question “whatever is up next in the rotation.”

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