Frustration, Patience, Hope, Success

Thank you for putting up with so many book reviews in this blog. Now it’s time to return to the backyard and rejoice in a good year of yard work and gardening.

Frustration

In 2017 we had a bad infestation of grubs. The first creature to discover the infestation was the resident skunk. He excavated large sections of the front and back lawns over the course of several nights in his quest for his next meal. When the leaves began to fall on the lawns and raking was required, the rake easily disturbed chunks of the remaining lawn as if they were fragments of a shag carpet.

The previous owner of our house probably had the lawn sprayed for grubs and other insect pests. We were contacted in the spring of our first year in the house by the company that had the contract for the spraying. Petrochemical pesticides have a tendency to kill beneficial insects as well as pests, so our weapon of choice for treating grubs is milky spore. I had begun application of the milky spore last autumn, so it is frustrating to see that the grubs had returned this year. It is also frustrating to see the repeat of a serious weed infestation this year.

red_pepper
One of the many red bell peppers that will be ready to pick soon.

Patience

Restoring health to any ecosystem takes time. According to recent article about the New Jersey Meadowlands, cleanup efforts began in the early 1970s. They continue to this day and must continue for many more years, but they have yielded remarkable results. A suburban yard is not an ecosystem, certainly not on the scale of the Meadowlands, but it can include enough biodiversity to yield observable results for a cleanup effort.

Weeds present a different challenge. The weapons of choice are my hands, used to pull the weeds, and corn gluten, which retards seed germination. Two applications of corn gluten did little to stop the appearance of crabgrass this year, but maybe I need to do a better job of timing the applications so that I will catch the peak weed germination times. It’s also clear that some sections of lawn might need to be dug up and reseeded, but timing is important there because this year’s weeds have already seeded the ground for next year’s crop.

Hope

Milky spore requires multiple applications over a period of two to three years to be effective. So even though it’s disappointing, it isn’t surprising that there are still grubs attacking our lawn this year. I am encouraged that some of the grubs I am finding this year are showing signs of milky spore disease, which means that there won’t mature into adult beetles next summer and lay new eggs for a new infestation.

The best hope for reducing weed infestations might lie in replacing more of the lawn with garden. Since moving into this home we’ve replaced about one hundred square feet of lawn with a vegetable garden. On the other side of the backyard about twenty square feet is occupied by pollinator-friendly perennials: raspberries, purple coneflowers, milkweed, and black-eyed Susans.

The raspberries in particular are popular with bumblebees, honeybees, and even wasps, and we’ve seen skipper butterflies, black and tiger swallowtail butterflies, and a monarch or two on the raspberries and other perennials. This year we also observed a clouded sulphur butterfly for the first time, and a goldfinch checked out the coneflowers one evening while we were enjoying dinner on the deck. Just below the deck a short stone wall encloses a new patch of blueberries and strawberries.

new_garden
Our new strawberry and blueberry patch. Yes, the lawn needs help; we’re working on that.

In terms of overall biodiversity there are encouraging signs. The first year we planted a vegetable garden we saw few earthworms. Now they appear regularly whenever we disturb the soil. We see lots of fireflies throughout the summer; fireflies are often victims of the sprays used to eliminate insect pests. As I said earlier, a single suburban yard is not an ecosystem, but these signs and sightings give us some hope that our efforts are paying off on a small scale.

Success

For the fourth summer now we have enjoyed a fine harvest from our small vegetable garden. In May and June we had fresh salad greens almost whenever we wanted. The brandywine, Juliette, and grape tomato vines have provided ingredients for sauce, Greek salads, tossed salads, and caprese since early August. We’ve enjoyed some green beans, lots of basil, some beautiful red bell peppers, and even a few yellow onions and green onions. The freezer is full of garden produce that we will be enjoying well into winter. We might even have some late-season broccoli in a few weeks.

This is an overly long post. Thank you for your patience if you’ve read this far. We are very grateful for the opportunity to exercise stewardship over a small corner of the natural world. We are very grateful for the visual pleasure and small amount of food it provides us. We are very grateful that we’ve been able to learn and put into practice a few steps for restoring the health of the soil and the environment in general. God is very good to us.

Thanks for stopping by!

Pat

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